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The Doomsday Testament by Douglas Jackson

The Doomsday Testament

by James Douglas

In 1937, Hitler sent an expedition to Tibet in search of the lost land of Thule, but they found something even more incredible.

In 1941, Heinrich Himmler spent a huge fortune, and sacrificed the lives of hundreds of concentration camp prisoners, to turn Wewelsburg Castle in Germany into a shrine to the SS with a dark secret at its heart.

Art recovery expert Jamie Saintclair thought he knew his grandfather, but when he stumbles upon the old man's lost diary he's astonished to find that the gentle Anglican clergyman was a decorated war hero who had served in the Special Air Service in World War Two. And his grandfather has one more surprise for him. Sewn in to the endpaper of the journal is a strange piece of Nazi symbolism.

This simple discovery launches him on a breathless chase across Europe and deep into Germany's dark past. There are some who will kill to find that which is lost, and although he doesn't know it, Saintclair holds the key to its hiding place.

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Reviews (2)

  1. By Ray Brown:
    Nov 12, 2012 at 03:45 PM

    I have read most of you Roman period Books (still to tackle Valerius) and have enjoyed them immensely, I have just discovered your new branch out into Thrillers (Recommended by Parminion on Igguldens Forum)

    I downloaded the The Doomsday Testament for my Kindle and found a really gripping thriller, it was so fast paced and kept me guessing until the end, I did figure out what Grandad did, and Dresden I knew what happened there but was not expecting that particular ending. "great",

    I now have The Isis Covenant, just started but looking good right from the start.

  2. By Derek Fisher:
    Dec 09, 2012 at 03:45 PM

    Not a book to buy if you have other plans because once you start reading this book you will not want to put it down.

    You quickly come absorbed in the character of Jamie Saintclair, his life changed forever, when, following the death of his Grandfather, who he had always thought of as "dotty old granddad who would not hurt a fly", he discovers his grandfather's secret past serving with the SAS in the Second World War.

    Jamie and new found girlfriend Sarah Grant are taken on a tour of mystery and intrigue across Europe and beyond. Some of the horrors of World War 2 are carefully entwined and re-lived by them through his grandfathers journal.

    Each chapter seems to end in a few words which grip you and make you think, one more chapter, I will just read one more, several chapters later and the day has passed so you may as well continue and finish the book.

    Looking forward to reading many more books from Mr James Douglas.









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